Tag Archives: dramaturg

‘She Kills Monsters’ dives into ‘Dungeons & Dragons’

Southern Oregon Professor of Theatre Arts Jackie Apodaca directed “She Kills Monsters” by Qui Nguyen, now playing in the SOU Black Box Theatre. The play takes place inside the fantasy role-play game, Dungeons & Dragons, which first became popular in the 1970s.

Actors play two roles, fantasy characters (with special powers and attributes) and real-life high school students playing D&D. Then there are monsters, including leprechauns, harpies and scary dolls. I met with Aurelia Grierson, who plays Agnes; Assistant Director Carlos-Zenen Trujillo; and Apodaca in the SOU Library Coffee Shop to talk about the play and the game.

CZT: Dungeons & Dragons has become a popular activity. It’s not on a board or a computer; it’s just papers and dice. You pick a character, then you get to build your character (with your stats and skills) and then you have an entire adventure. But it’s all just people around a table telling stories. Continue reading ‘She Kills Monsters’ dives into ‘Dungeons & Dragons’

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OSF dramaturg: Bringing the vision to the stage

Amrita Ramanan, director of literary development and dramaturgy, is now in her second season at the Oregon Shakespeare Festival. With a BFA in theater history and dramaturgy from the University of Arizona, Ramadan went on to an extensive career in dramaturgy before coming to Ashland. Her credits include production dramaturg for five seasons at the Arena Stage in Washington, DC. We met at the Pony Espresso Café.

EH: What is dramaturgy?

AR: It’s definitely a recent field for America; it first began as an official title in Europe in the late 1800s. It’s a position where you support the contextualization of the piece of theater, support the approach and concept of a production (based on the playwright and the director’s vision) and translate that contextualization and that research to both a company of actors and designers as well as an audience. Dramaturgy is bridging the content from what happens in the rehearsal room to how an audience experiences it.

I create research packets, work with playwrights on the development of their scripts, attend rehearsals and am a second pair of eyes for the director and/or the playwright — in terms of the accessibility of a production and elements that they want to illuminate.

EH: What makes a great play?

AR: A great play is one that is truly in the voice and vision of the author: That challenges; that engages; that creates a sense of inquiry and curiosity; that gives us a new perspective or way of thinking; that allows for a way to see the world that we haven’t seen before; or gives us a different sense of empathy for characters; and that suspends our disbelief, that we can believe and commit to the world of it; and that stays with us in some way.

Continue reading OSF dramaturg: Bringing the vision to the stage

Lue Morgan Douthit

Lue Morgan Douthit
Lue Morgan Douthit

Lue Morgan Douthit, the Oregon Shakespeare Festival’s director of literary development and dramaturgy, has spent 20 seasons at OSF and served as production dramaturg for more than 40 productions, including “The Unfortunates,” “Throne of Blood” and “Equivocation.” Douthit’s presentations are widely known for their understated humor and extraordinary wit. We got together in her office on the OSF campus. This is the first of a two-part column.

EH: What is dramaturgy?

LD: Dramaturgy is the study of dramatic structure. Anything that has to do with how a play is put together is the world of dramaturgy. I happen to be one person that pays attention to that. I’m not the only person that interprets the dramatic architecture of a play. I pay attention to the story to offer advice to a director, actors and designers and to have conversations with audiences.

Continue reading Lue Morgan Douthit